Wednesday, 25 February 2015

Education Conference



www.futuroeventos.com.br/britishschool  

Coming soon, registration will be open. In the meantime, browse the (almost 
ready) website to see what workshops are available so as to decide your choices. 




Formative Assessment





Dylan Wiliam’s book, Embedded Formative Assessment, is filled with a number of insights gained from his 35 years of experience in education. The foundation of the book highlights the importance of formative assessment as a tool to improve teacher practice and, ultimately, improve student learning.
In the book, he provides the 5 strategies that he has come to believe are core to successful formative assessment practice in the classroom:
1. Clarifying, sharing, and understanding learning intentions and criteria for success 
2. Engineering effective classroom discussions, activities, and learning tasks that elicit evidence of learning 
3. Providing feedback that moves learning forward 
4. Activating learners as instructional resources for one another 
5. Activating learners as owners of their own learning 

The Classroom Experiment with Dylan Wiliam





This is the second part in a two-part series in which, Professor Dylan Wiliam sets up an experimental school classroom. For one term, he takes over a Year 8 class (TBS class 6) at a secondary comprehensive to test simple ideas that he believes could improve the quality of our children's education.

Some of the higher ability students are not responding well to the new rule of No Hands Up in class, and Wiliam is worried they are at risk of being left behind.

There is a classroom revolt when the teachers remove grades from work. The idea is to make the students actually read the comments on their work in order to help them improve, but they are left confused and angry after becoming so used to the traditional grading system.

By the end of term, however, even Wiliam is surprised by the impact the experiment has had on the students' academic achievement.

Observation, Assessment and Planning: EYFS



Planning is the bane of many teachers’ lives and it can take over your practice. Neil Farmer shows how observations and assessment can help ease the burden of detailed planning

Author details

Neil Farmer has a background in early years education as a nursery and reception class teacher, advisory teacher, deputy head, Foundation Stage consultant and head of early years. He has made countless visits to numerous settings and schools, has...
Too often, teachers plan first and try to fit children into the plan. This will result in a curriculum that does not meet the needs of the children and exasperation and exhaustion on behalf of the adults. To plan effectively, you need to start with observations (what are the children doing?) then assessment of observations (what are they telling you about individual children?). Only then should you start planning.
Plans should be adaptable – indeed, the most exciting aspect of Early Years is the freedom to respond to children’s actions and adapt your planning and provision to suit. It also helps you to gain ownership of the lesson and prevents you being guided by others who do not know your children or how they work or learn. As such, you cannot plan for a Friday on Monday – how do you know how the children’s learning will develop during the week? Working in this way directs the focus on activity rather than quality learning.

Observation

There are numerous types of observation – but remember the EYFS does state: ‘Practitioners must consider the individual needs, interests, and stage of development of each child in their care, and must use this information to plan a challenging and enjoyable experience for each child in all of the areas of learning and development.’
It goes on to say: ‘Practitioners should respond to their own day-to-day observations about children’s progress and observations […] Assessment should not entail prolonged breaks from interaction with children, nor require excessive paperwork. Paperwork should be limited to that which is absolutely necessary to promote children’s successful learning and development.’
Here, the focus is on short-term observations which ensure that all children are observed on a regular basis. An observation needs to be of something that is significant to an individual – a ‘wow’ moment – not a tick list.

What is observation?

  • Watching
  • Listening
  • Noticing what children are doing as a whole – their personality, behaviour, what they say, and their learning
  • Noticing how they respond to your setting, to different approaches, to different people
  • Noticing how they respond to new experiences, signs of how they are feeling

Why observe?

We gather essential information about the children:
  • their individuality
  • their stage of development
  • their interests
  • their needs and
  • their learning styles
This gives us information to share with parents and an insight into the received curriculum, thereby challenging assumptions.
Also remember:
  • An observation needs to add value and not be an end in itself.
  • It’s crucial that all members of the team are involved in the observation process, as children respond differently depending on the adult, and adults pick up on different aspects of learning.
  • Create a Rota system so a select number of children are the focus each day
  • With your routines in place, you will have ample time to be with these children, playing, exploring and observing.
  • This will ensure that, over a two-week period, your children will have been observed during self-initiated or adult initiated challenges.
  • Put any observations and evidence straight into children’s records (this gets the bureaucracy out of the way quickly)
  • The best models involve all practitioners and set aside 15 minutes at the end of the day to reflect and discuss what happened during the day, who was doing what and where, and how this can be developed the next day to extend learning opportunities. This is effectively short-term planning.
  • It is useful and practical to keep a check list of observations to ensure that you are getting coverage and that children have access to all areas of learning.  This will also allow you to look at your provision and ask questions of where the learning is happening and what areas are being covered, which less so – where do you need to intervene. 







World Book Day 6th March 2015




  1. World Book Day is a celebration! It's a celebration of authors, illustrators, books and (most importantly) it's a celebration of reading. In fact, it's the biggest celebration of its kind, designated by UNESCO as a worldwide celebration of books and reading, and marked in over 100 countries all over the world.
  2. Resources:

  3. Curiosity





    Students who are curious ask questions, explore topics, and value learning for its own sake.  Intellectually curious students want to know how and why the world works as it does; they are not afraid to challenge themselves or others with new ideas and experiences.  Regardless of what they know or don’t know, they want to understand.



    Tuesday, 10 February 2015

    Learner Profile


    Please see some ideas below to promote our school's learner profile with your students: 


    Pinterest: Learner Profile


    Resources and Lesson Ideas

    Web 2.0



    Social media provides a variety of tools, commonly referred to as Web 2.0, 
    that educators can use to engage students and enhance essential skills 
    (communication, collaboration, creativity, media literacy, technological 
    proficiency, global awareness. 

    The 35 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools


    Talk for Writing units of work and resources


    Banner image on resources page


    Two speakers will present ideas about Talk for Writing at TBS's Education Conference at the end of March. Julia Strong will focus on Talk for Writing strategies across the curriculum in the Senior school and Kaye Haywood will do the same with Primary school teachers. 

    For further information about Speakers at this year's Education Conference, please see the links on this blog to their websites. 





    Visible Thinking








    Wordle




    Wordle is used to generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. You can tweak your clouds with different fonts, layouts, and colour schemes. The images you create with Wordle are yours to use however you like.

    Lesson activities using Wordle

    More ideas for Word Clouds

    Safer Internet Day 2015



    Safer Internet Day (SID) is organised by Insafe in February of each year to promote safer and more responsible use of online technology and mobile phones, especially amongst children and young people across the world.



    More free resources for the classroom



    The resources below are great for Primary teachers, especially at the beginning of the school year, when you need some inspiration and ideas for those bare classroom walls.

    Instant Display

    RR logo 2013

    Rainbow Resources


    Tuesday, 3 February 2015

    Google Drive


           12 Effective Ways To Use Google Drive In Education

    A visual guide put together by Susan Oxnevad on Glogster. In the graphic, she showcases a dozen different ways to easily and effectively integrate Google Drive into your classroom.


    google docs for learning

    The Classroom Experiment with Dylan Wiliam


    In this two-part series, theory and practice meet head on as education expert Professor Dylan Wiliam sets up an experimental school classroom. For one term, he takes over a Year 8 class (TBS class 6) at a secondary comprehensive to test simple ideas that he believes could improve the quality of our children's education.

    Some of the higher ability students are not responding well to the new rule of No Hands Up in class, and Wiliam is worried they are at risk of being left behind.

    There is a classroom revolt when the teachers remove grades from work. The idea is to make the students actually read the comments on their work in order to help them improve, but they are left confused and angry after becoming so used to the traditional grading system.

    By the end of term, however, even Wiliam is surprised by the impact the experiment has had on the students' academic achievement.

    Language





    English Classes

    Remember that English classes will begin next week and resume after Carnival.

    If you are a new Assistant Teacher or Teacher who would like to join an English class after school (they are free!), please contact Stephanie Crockett to enquire:

    stephanie@newstart.com.br

    Harvard Wide World






    Harvard Wide World contacted me this week to say that registration for February´s courses are now open.

    The new online professional development course Making Learning Visible: The Power of Group Learning and Documentation in Classrooms is about to make its debut.

    The course will run from the 23rd of February to the 24th of May


    From all the feedback that we have received, it is far more productive if you undertake the Harvard courses as a small group, either within your subject or as a year group team.

    Please let me know if you wish to take this Harvard course by 6th February so that I can register your group.

    Behaviour Management


    Behaviour Management Strategies from Bill Rogers

            The Black Dot in a White Square: What do you focus on?


    Bill Rogers is an education consultant. A teacher by profession, Bill now lectures widely on discipline and behaviour management issues; classroom management; stress and teaching; colleague support; developing peer-support programs for teachers and developing community-oriented policies for behaviour management, based on whole-school approaches.





    Read on...


    Behaviour Management: A Bill Rogers Top 10







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